Frequently Asked Questions

Phone Support

Support Phone

800-808-0414

Check most frequently asked questions here, if you still need help then please contact us at info@flexrockcoatings.com

FX-100

FX-100 has wide application temperature range. For cold-weather roofing applications, The temperature can be as low as 35°F.

Using FlexRock, even freezing weather won’t affect its application or adhesion. There is no limit to FlexRock’s recoat window; it will always rebond to itself.   At temperatures well below freezing, FlexRock Coatings cure completely. FlexRock Coatings typically takes 24-36 hours to cure fully – in below-freezing temperatures, the cure time will be a little longer.

When installing in cold temperatures.  It is important to keep the product warm before application.  Keep the product at room temperature before mixing. We Strongly Recommend the use of electric blankets to keep the product warm before mixing.

In hot temperatures. keep the product cool and at room temperature prior to mixing. Keep in the buckets out of direct sunlight or a tarp or insulated pad to help keep the material cool.

HEAT RESISTANCE – CONTINUOUS: 212F / 100C

MINIMUM SERVICE TEMPERATURE:
– 20 to – 40 F / – 30 to – 40

THICKENING: When a thicker product is needed to fill cracks or build up, follow small batch instructions and use any of the pre-approved thick-eners to achieve the thickness desired. Thickeners include: hemp hurd, crushed walnut shells, fumed silica, crushed polyethylene, and powdered polystyrene.

Thickening agents can be purchased at local paint stores.

Watch this video on using a thickening agent.

Not all roofs are candidates for refurbishing. Use Extreme Caution when doing any roof repair always use safety equipment. When in doubt consult a professional roofing contractor

 

1. Surfaces prone to pedestrian traffic, decks, and frequent traffic bearing. Unless using a topcoat such as a polyaspartic or adding an aggregate for slip resistance.

2. Surfaces that are not prepared, including but not limited to wet, dusty, oily, mildewed, heavily chalked, blistered, or otherwise structurally unsound surfaces.

3. Oil-bleeding and solvent-bleeding materials. The list includes, but is not limited to, some vulcanized rubber products, tapes, failed sealants, some caulking compounds, and asphaltic/mastic materials without appropriate preparation.

4. Surfaces where adhesion has not been verified by testing.

5. New EPDM may need a primer or surface prep.

  1. FlexRock should be at room temperature when ready to use
  2. We recommend Part A be stored at room temperature. No less than 32°F (0°C).
  3. The Part A bucket should be stored upside down for ease of mixing when used. Turn bucket upside (minimum, at least one day) before use.
  4. We recommended Part B be stored at temperatures between 75° to 105°F (24° to 41°C).
  5. Products must be kept free of moisture. Keep the containers closed because the product absorbs moisture from the air over time. Moisture in the product causes it to produce CO2 gas which may cause pressure build-up inside a sealed container.
  1. You will only have 30 to 40 minutes (See curing estimates chart) to apply your coating material (after Part A and Part B are mixed together) to coat your surfaces before the coating material starts to harden.
  2. In order to begin coating, the substrate must be dry which is generally not achievable without having the dew point temperature being at least 5°C or 10°F below the substrate temperature.

No, remove any silicon based materials. *FlexRock Coatings will not adhere to silicone!

  1. It is recommended that Part A be stored at room temperature. No less than 32°F (0°C).
  2. The Part A bucket should be stored upside down for ease of mixing when used. Turn bucket upside (minimum. one day) before use.
  3. Recommended Part B be stored at temperatures between 75° to 105°F (24° to 41°C).
  4. Products must be kept free of moisture. Keep the containers closed because the product absorbs moisture from the air over time. Moisture in the product causes it to produce CO2 gas which may cause pressure build-up inside a sealed container.

We have a network of installers for you to choose from.

Large volume orders (20,000 sq ft plus) may have up to a 3-4 week lead time based on size.  We try to maintain an inventory while providing our customers with fresh products.

Resinous is a type of flooring that is made of different chemistries such as FlexRock Coatings Base, epoxy, urethane, and methyl methacrylate (MMA). These are multi-component systems consisting of a resin and hardener, mixed together on-site prior to application. A chemical reaction between these components causes the mixture to harden. Resinous floors are preferred in commercial and industrial spaces because they are seamless and become part of the structure, allowing for superior durability and cleanability. Resinous floors are long lasting and can be formulated to meet specific criteria including chemical, impact, stain, and water resistance. Aggregates, pigments, decorative chips and flakes can be added to achieve a desired look or design

When you finish mixing the Part A and Part B, the pot life will be about a half-hour at room temperature and a 24-hour cure. Wait approximately 24 hours (depending on temperature) for the FX-100 and Coatings to dry prior to top coating with the clear coat of your choice.

  1. It is recommended that Part A be stored at room temperature. No less than 32°F (0°C).
  2. The Part A bucket should be stored upside down for ease of mixing when used. Turn bucket upside (minimum. one day) before use.
  3. Recommended Part B be stored at temperatures between 75° to 105°F (24° to 41°C).
  4. Products must be kept free of moisture. Keep the containers closed because the product absorbs moisture from the air over time. Moisture in the product causes it to produce CO2 gas which may cause pressure build-up inside a sealed container.

Flooring

Concrete Laitance, is a weak, milky layer of cement and aggregate fines on a concrete surface that is usually caused by an overwet mixture, overworking the mixture, improper or excessive finishing, or combination thereof.

We know that choosing a  top coat for a floor coating can get confusing. With several formulations available, how do you know which is best for you? Which type you choose may also depend on whether you are applying it yourself or having it professionally installed. For this reason, we have decided to review the various clear coat options available to help you decide which is best suited for you.

A  top coat has many benefits, besides enhancing the look of your color coat, it will also protect the optional color flakes and the rest of the coating from the numerous elements that a floor encounters. It does this by acting as the sacrificial layer.

The number one rule when choosing a top coat for your floor coating; The top coat should be of equal or greater performance than the base coat. Remember, your coating is only as good as the weakest link. It will only perform as well as the final coat that is applied.

Allow the FlexRock Coatings™ Team to help you plan your floor coating project. Our team of industry experts provides you with product recommendations. Furthermore, we will work hand-in-hand with your qualified contractors to ensure the end results exceed your expectations.

Our 10 years of industry experience have provided us with invaluable insight on not only the importance of facility hygiene by keeping plant killing pathogens controlled, but also the equal importance of staying compliant in front of regulation changes as they happen.  With more and more industry scrutiny, food-grade and pharmaceutical standards will become mandatory.

Although it may not be immediately evident, trafficking impact and the stress imposed on the bond line through repeated fluctuations in temperature will eventually cause the laitance interface layer to delaminate, resulting in the flooring installation failing,” writes Neil Sanders, in the Contract Flooring Journal.

Laitance can cost your team big bucks and unnecessary man-hours down the line to repair or replace any coating applied on top of it.

So, what is laitance?

Laitance is a weak, easily-crumbled layer on the surface of concrete, consisting of cement and fine aggregates that rise to the surface when too much water is added. Laitance may also be caused by over-trowelling, rain damage, or poor curing.

Laitance is always present on new concrete – but unfortunately, age is no guarantee that it’s not present unless it has been removed by previous surface preparation. The laitance layer may look like nothing more than fine dust, or it can reach a depth of several millimeters or more.

How do I test for laitance?

Scrape the surface of your concrete floor with a knife. If a powdery material can be scraped from the surface, excessive laitance is present.

To get a sense of how thick the laitance is, “Score the surface of the substrate with a steel edge until the main aggregate is reached,” Sanders writes. If your project needs a more accurate measure, there is also scratch testing equipment available.

Then, how do I remove it?

There are several ways to remove laitance. The method depends on how much area the laitance is covering, how thick the layer is, and how detailed your work needs to be.

If laitance is thicker, mechanical planing may be preferred. Surface planers, also called scarifiers or milling machines, remove the layer faster and more aggressively because “they use the pummeling action of multi-tipped cutting wheels that rotate at high speeds to chip away at the surface,” ConcreteNetwork.com explains.

In large areas, shot blasting and grinding are the fastest and most efficient ways to remove laitance, preparing thousands of square feet at a single go. Scrabbling, abrading, or grinding are also recommended for removing laitance in areas that require more precision, with equipment designed for control, ease of handling, and safe operation in smaller areas and on edge detail.

Acid etching can remove laitance but has some disadvantages. Results vary underprepared denser surface areas. Treated surfaces must be flushed with water, rinsed with a neutralizing wash, flushed with water again, then fully dried before a coating can be applied.

For proper bonding of overlays and coatings, it is important that a concrete surface has the correct Concrete Surface Profile or CSP. A CSP rating is a standardized rating that allows you to visually determine the concrete surface roughness.  We recommend a CSP Rating 3 for FX-100
The most important step in creating a quality floor is the preparation. For the proper bonding of any coating or overlay, you need to properly prepare the floor with the proper concrete surface profile. What is a concrete surface profile? A concrete surface profile, known as a CSP, is a standardized measure for the ‘roughness’ of a surface that is defined by the International Concrete Repair Institute (ICRI). A very rough surface will have a high CSP number, such as CSP 9. A very smooth surface with almost no preparation at all will be a CSP 1.

See concrete prep guide here.  https://documents.flexrockcoatings.com/flexrockcoatingsconcreteprepguide

 

FlexRock Coatings

 

 

CSP Rating 2

This rating can be achieved with tooling that carries a 70–80 Grit rating.
For coating applications from 2–3 mil thickness, the surface profile should be a CSP.

 

 

FlexRock Coatings

CSP Rating 3

This rating can be achieved with tooling that carries a 30-40 Grit rating.
For coating applications from 4–5 mil thickness, the surface profile should be a CSP 3.

 

 

FlexRock Coatings

 

CSP Rating 4

This rating can be achieved with tooling that carries a 16 Grit rating.
For coating applications from 15–50 mil thickness, the surface should be a CSP 4.

f you plan to overlay or restore existing concrete, proper surface preparation is essential to achieving good results. Preparing concrete surfaces for coatings, overlays, stains, or repair materials is a time-consuming task that many contractors perform reluctantly or are tempted to overlook altogether. If you’ve ever skipped this essential first step in the process, you undoubtedly learned the hard way how critical it is to the success of the job.

Concrete surfaces are prepared prior to resurfacing concrete to look like plain concrete again or to be upgraded to a decorative finish. Today polymers can be applied as thin as 1/8 ” or up to 3/4″ thick and stamped, producing a surface that looks just like a normal stamped concrete surface.

Surfaces are also prepared prior to various floor-coating installations in industrial, commercial, and institutional applications. The most important characteristic of resurfacing materials or floor coatings is the texture of the concrete. This section offers an overview of the steps required for surface preparation as well as an introduction to the machinery that is used. If you plan to overlay or restore existing concrete, proper surface preparation is essential to achieving good results. It could be twice the cost to reinstall a floor that had defects.

We recommend a Level 3 Profile Rating for FX-100

See concrete prep guide here.  https://documents.flexrockcoatings.com/flexrockcoatingsconcreteprepguide

  1. You will only have 30 to 40 minutes (See curing estimates chart) to apply your coating material (after Part A and Part B are mixed together) to the surfaces before the coating material starts to harden.
  2. In order to begin coating, the substrate must be dry which is generally not achievable without having the dew point temperature being at least 5°C or 10°F below the substrate temperature.

1lb per 10 Sq ft. We recommend having double that to broadcast to rejection. People that have experience can typically use 50lbs per 400sf to broadcast to rejection.

Guide to broadcasting Decorative Chip

 

 

We know that choosing a  top coat for a floor coating can get confusing. With several formulations available, how do you know which is best for you? Which type you choose may also depend on whether you are applying it yourself or having it professionally installed. For this reason, we have decided to review the various clear coat options available to help you decide which is best suited for you.

A  top coat has many benefits, besides enhancing the look of your color coat, it will also protect the optional color flakes and the rest of the coating from the numerous elements that a floor encounters. It does this by acting as the sacrificial layer.

The number one rule when choosing a top coat for your floor coating; The top coat should be of equal or greater performance than the base coat. Remember, your coating is only as good as the weakest link. It will only perform as well as the final coat that is applied.

Roofing

A thoroughly cleaned roof is critical for a long-lasting application.

1. The owner/installer must prepare the substrate for the roof by addressing all of the conditions outlined in this document. Examine substrates to receive new roofing. Please do not proceed with the FlexRock Coating installation until unsatisfactory conditions have been corrected appropriately.

2. Make sure the substrate is free of delamination and defects (holes & other openings, tears, cuts, and open or partially opened seams).

If the defects are larger than 1/8”, repair before coating application.

3. Clean, dry and clear surfaces must be used to apply coatings or repair, free from dust, grease, wax, or other incompatible substances to facilitate appropriate adhesion. If grease, oils or heavy contaminants are present on the roof surface, remove them with a mild detergent prior to final cleaning. The use of bleach mixed with water can be used to remove algae, fungi, or vegetation. Thoroughly rinse surface and allow to dry prior to coating.

4. Roof decks that are deteriorated or structurally unsound should be replaced.

One FlexRock 5-Gal Kit Covers Aprox 150-225 Sq ft of flat smooth surfaces. We recommend a minimum of 32 mills of coverage. Sq. Ft/Kit 32 ml @ 250 ft.².

Flexible Rock Coating is super versatile it can be applied extra thick for added Roof Coating protection. By applying more than the minimum, you simply add more protection and extend the lifespan even further. This thicker system is perfect for filling cracks and imperfections. A chemical bond is formed between FlexRock and the roof, creating a waterproof casement.

*Coverage rates can vary depending on the type of roof substrate, surface condition and application technique.

For more details follow this link.  FX-100 Coverage Guide

  • Blisters/Splits: To repair large splits/blisters, use polyester Reinforcing fabric 1/16″ thick in three layers and spread 2″ to 4″ beyond the split/blister area.
  • Flashing details, penetrations, and curbs, FlexRock Coatings 1/8″ thick shall be applied over the substrate. The edges of the coatings shall be feathered for the water to flow over the flashing details.
  • Membrane Repair: Check the roof substrates carefully for defects (holes, openings). When repairing defects over 1/8″ wide, use polyester reinforcing fabric. Add a thick coating in a three-course fashion and spread to 2” to 4” beyond the repaired areas.
  • Curb Flashings: All curb flashings shall be dressed in at least a 2” wide x 1/8” thick of FlexRock Coatings
  • Curbed AC Units: All curb flashings shall be covered with at least a 2” wide x 1/8” The perimeter shall be FlexRock Coatings FX-100
  • Penetrations: FlexRock Coatings shall be applied around the base of the penetration, extending at least 4” onto the vertical and 4” onto the base. Use additional material if needed
  • Seams: All seams and areas around roof protrusions (vents, scuttle hatches, pitch pans, etc.) are to be treated with FlexRock Coatings FX-100 at 1/8” thickening agent such as crushed walnut shells may be used if needed to achieve a watertight reinforced seal.
  • Skylights All exposed skylight fasteners shall be covered with FlexRock Coatings FX-100 All curbed corners joints shall be covered FlexRock Coatings at least 2” wide x 1/8” thick.
  • Prior to applying FlexRock Coatings, inspect the preliminary work / flashing details for problem areas (e.g., gaps, cracks, fish mouths, air pockets, etc.).

The visco-elastomeric adhesive technology of FLEX Fabric Seam Tapes will bond to almost any clean and a dry surface such as plastic, wood, metal, concrete, masonry, etc.  Dusty or porous surfaces should be primed with FlexRock Tape primer prior to application of the tape.  FLEX Fabric Seam Tape  will also bond to properly cleaned and prepared roofing materials such as EPDM, TPO, PVC, BUR, SBS, and APP.

When it is important to add reinforcement fabric mat or seam tape when repairing a flat roof with a seal coating. Reinforcement fabric plays a crucial role in ensuring the long-term durability and integrity of a flat roof system.

Flat roofs are prone to certain challenges due to their design and exposure to various weather conditions. Over time, they may develop cracks, punctures, or areas of weakened substrate, which can compromise their ability to keep out water and protect the underlying structure. That's where reinforcement fabric comes into play.

The primary purpose of reinforcement fabric is to provide an extra layer of strength and support to the roof membrane. It acts as a reinforcing barrier that helps to distribute stress and load across the surface, minimizing the risk of future damage. Here are a few instances when adding reinforcement fabric becomes particularly important during the repair process:

  1. Cracked or Damaged Areas: If there are noticeable cracks or damaged sections on the flat roof, applying reinforcement fabric becomes crucial. The fabric helps to bridge gaps and reinforce weak areas, preventing further spreading of cracks and providing additional structural stability.

  2. High-Stress Zones: Certain areas of a flat roof experience more stress and strain than others. These can include seams, joints, corners, and areas where equipment, such as HVAC units or vent pipes, are installed. Applying reinforcement fabric in these high-stress zones adds an extra layer of protection and strength to prevent future issues.

  3. Prior Application Failures: If the flat roof has undergone previous seal coating applications that have failed or shown signs of deterioration, it is advisable to use reinforcement fabric during repairs. The fabric helps to reinforce the existing coating, providing an added layer of strength and preventing premature failures.

  4. Roofing System Aging: As a flat roof ages, it becomes more susceptible to wear and tear. When repairing an older flat roof with seal coating, incorporating reinforcement fabric can enhance its overall resilience and extend its lifespan by reinforcing aging membranes and improving resistance to external factors like UV radiation or foot traffic.

In summary, adding reinforcement fabric is crucial when repairing a flat roof with a seal coating. It provides additional strength, stability, and protection to the roof membrane, especially in areas prone to damage, high-stress zones, cases of prior coating failures, and as the roof ages. By incorporating reinforcement fabric into the repair process, you can ensure a more durable, long-lasting, and reliable flat roof system.

Simply cut the tape to the desired length, peel off the backing, and apply it to the surface. The tape will adhere firmly, providing a strong and durable seal. 

Trapped moisture in a roof coating can create blisters and bubbling, ultimately leading to the failure of the roof coating through the following process:

1. **Moisture Entrapment:** When moisture is present on the roof's surface or within the substrate (the layer beneath the coating), it can become trapped between the roofing material and the roof coating during the application process. This trapped moisture forms a barrier within the roofing system.

2. **Heat and Expansion:** When the sun's heat or other environmental factors warm the roof, the trapped moisture begins to heat up as well. As moisture heats, it expands, creating pressure underneath the roof coating.

3. **Blisters Form:** The increasing pressure from the expanding moisture seeks an escape route. This pressure forces the roof coating to separate from the substrate in the affected areas, creating pockets or bubbles known as blisters. These blisters can range in size and are typically visible on the surface of the roof coating.

4. **Compromised Coating Integrity:** As the blisters expand and multiply, they weaken the adhesion between the roof coating and the substrate. This compromised adhesion can lead to the roof coating separating or peeling away from the roof surface.

5. **Coating Failure:** The blisters and bubbling not only compromise the appearance of the roof but also reduce the protective capabilities of the coating. Over time, these weakened areas may crack or rupture, allowing water to penetrate the roofing system, potentially causing leaks and further damage.

In summary, trapped moisture creates blisters and bubbling in a roof coating by generating pressure as it expands due to heat, causing the coating to detach from the substrate. This compromised adhesion and structural integrity can lead to the eventual failure of the roof coating, necessitating repairs or reapplication to maintain the roof's protection and performance. Proper surface preparation, moisture testing, and adherence to manufacturer guidelines are crucial steps in preventing this issue and ensuring the long-term success of a roof coating.